Fly Tyer of the Month: 2016 Bonus Feature Matt Grajewski

 

 

This is a bonus interview that I couldn’t get up in 2016 with everything going on. Matt Grajewski is one half of the website Fly Obsession, and is another incredible fly fisherman and fly designer from Michigan.


First off- thank you for taking the time to answer these questions. I have been a big fan of your work for a long time now. Being obsessed the last few years on big trout streamers, I get pretty geeked out looking at what you come up with. The musky stuff is absolutely insane.

What would you say to someone who wants to start tying musky flies? Any words of encouragement, practical advice, any scared straight tactics?
I think the main thing someone who wants to get into tying and fishing muskie flies, is to consider the action of the fly. Muskies don’t feed often, so triggering them is difficult. The fly needs to have a triggering action. Everything that goes into the fly should consider profile and action. A fly that swims straight usually won’t get the job done.

 

 

 

What makes or breaks a well designed musky fly? What are the common problems?
The most common problem I see is too much material. A fly will reach a point of diminishing return if you make it too large, or add too much material. Muskie fishing is a lot of casting and retrieving practice. You must be able to cast it for hours on end, and you must be able to “fish” it. In my opinion, I will take action over pushing water any day. It is difficult to truly push water in the way double bladed buck-tails or pounders do. Why muskies absolutely use their lateral lines to detect prey, they are also quite visual. The visual aspect is what I key in on. In my experience, this is easier to achieve over the course of an eight hour day of fishing. Fishing flies with giant heads or a lot of materials take more energy to fish as they are harder to cast and retrieve. It is also more difficult to achieve a triggering action. Not impossible, but more difficult. A lot of ways to approach it. This is just my preference and how I’ve had success.

 

 

Similarly, what would you say to someone that wants to fly fish for muskies? What does it take? Is it more mental or physical?

 

It’s both really, but I would say it takes more mental strength. If you tie flies that won’t exhaust you both casting and fishing them, then it’s really about mentally staying in the game. Eats are usually few and far between. If you are surprised by a fish, that opportunity could be over in a second or two. If you are just retrieving your fly and not fishing it because you’re mentally exhausted, you might as well call it a day. Its a difficult thing to believe there is a muskie behind your fly on every cast, but that is how you should approach it. Even when you haven’t seen one for hours or days. Take a break if you need to take time to reset mentally. Don’t waste a possible opportunity.

 

 

How did the formation of Fly Obsession push the two of you as far as fly design is concerned- what type of working relationship do you two have?

 


Nick and I are like brothers from another mother. Our approach to fishing and tying is like talking to the mirror. Still, Nick’s approach to color and use of certain materials definitely inspired and pushed me as a tier. No doubt about that.

 

How would you describe your design process? Do you like to sketch out flies before sitting down to tie, or is something already burned in your mind- a profile, a material, a color scheme, or maybe a problem to solve in a specific scenario?

 

I have sketched them before, but ideas typically get burned into my brain. It could be a color scheme, a profile, an action, or all of the above. Those ideas come from a variety of places. Seeing another tier’s fly, something that happened on a previous outing, or thinking about upcoming water conditions. Other times its completely random. Especially during a sleepless night.

 

 

This fly clearly passes the “will it hunt” test.

 

What what point does a fly go from “cool- I like this” to people hounding you for orders? What is your revision process like? How much can any one original design change?
I usually know the first time I fish the fly if it will get eaten. If it swims the way I want, its only a matter of time. If it doesn’t swim, then its back to the drawing board. Sometimes the idea gets scrapped all together when I don’t like how it looks in the water altogether. Its more or less a feeling based on experience. I am lucky enough to have two experienced muskie fisherman as brothers, so I have more testers. They are the same way. First time its coming back to the boat…”oh this is getting eaten.” Or, “I don’t like it. Its not kicking enough” and off it comes.

 

More about Fly Obsession- what would you like to see happen with the platform? Any branding thoughts? I know the two of you live pretty hectic lives in between custom orders.
I would like to see Nick and I have more free time. Life has put a lot more on our plate and FO has sat on the back burner. I would love to update the platform and provide more content. We have kicked around the idea of guest contributors to help fill the gap and provide variety.

 

Matt’s Go Big (or) Go Home fly……WOW.

 

GBGH (Go Big or Go Home)- is it a fly or a mentality?
A mentality for sure. You have to be willing to stick to your guns as long as it takes. GBGH is more “go big and go hard”. Going big is chasing muskie on a fly, and you have to put in the time and effort. Probably the biggest challenge for a freshwater fly fisherman.

 

You guys wrote a piece called “Streamer Architecture” back in 2013. It was a tremendous help to me as I was tying big flies like crazy. I had the bug, but the designs lacked specific purpose- I was tying flies to tie flies- and that is okay, but when it comes to thinking about pattern development- that article really gave me focus. It gave me a list of questions to answer.

One question really stood out- “What water conditions do I want to fish this fly in”- that is brilliant. For the average angler, he has his box of flies- and regardless what water condition he faces, he’s going to throw one of those flies- for one inconsequential reason or another.

Tell me more about this concept- how do you round out a box facing this task?

 

Matt’s Nut Butter with a modified Deer Hair Sculpin Head….changing the action, changing the water resistance and profile.

 

Think about where the fish will be, and how will you get a fly they can see into the strike zone.  This could fishing a weighted fly to reach depth in high water river conditions, a dark fly to be fished in low visibility water conditions, or fly that really pauses during post frontal conditions…just to name a few examples. I always make sure I have flies that can be fished in any part of the water column I think the fish will be in, and whatever mood they may be in. Do I need to fish a fly that swims well with quick erratic strips because the fish are aggressive, or do I want fly that fishes will on long strips with long pauses because they are passive? Do I want a dark fly for low visibility water, or natural colors in clearer water? You should always carry at least a few flies for every possible water condition and fish mood.

 

 

Matt- you seem to be pretty focused on fly fishing for muskies right now. Do you still chase big browns around? Which is more difficult to target consistently- monster browns or monster muskies? Why?
I haven’t fished for big browns in a few years. Mostly due to the proximity in which those waters are to where I live. Those waters are further than muskie waters. I’m sure I will still get after them here and there.

While big browns (2’ or bigger) are definitely difficult to catch, muskies are still tougher in most fisheries. It really comes down to two things, numbers and metabolism. Muskies, by nature’s design, are a low density fish with slow metabolisms. This way they can’t wipe out other species. Big browns are typically low density as well in most rivers, but most waters can still support more big browns than muskies. And an adult muskie typically goes longer periods of time without feeding.

 

Are you guys doing any tying shows or fishing shows this year?
The only thing I have on my schedule right now is Bar Flies with Schultz Outfitters on March 22nd. I will hopefully be tying at my brother’s booth (Musk-E Fly Fishing Adventures) at the Midwest Tying Expo.

If you have followed Matt’s Instagram- you have seen first hand the adversities he has faced the last 3 plus years. He has met all obstacles with a warrior’s spirit and a smile. In this photo, momentary rest.

What is in store for 2017 and beyond for each of you? Any aspirations fly fishing/life/ other?
2017 will be an interesting year for me. As many know, I’m still adapting to an above knee amputation of my left leg earlier this year. It has definitely given me a different approach to life and fishing. 2017 will definitely be a wild card year for me.

 

 

Fly Obsession is one of favorite websites to reference. The design aspect and the tutorials for a predator noob- are truly appreciated. For a relatively small, understated website- it packs a TON of relevant content. With the catalog of patterns you both have- have you entertained the idea on collaborating on a tying book? You could probably print money if you did.
We have discussed what ways can produce more content. Not sure that would ever mean a book or not. Unfortunately, we both don’t have the time to produce the content we would like, as often as we would like.  Thankfully there are a number of other great tiers putting out great stuff, as well.

 


Matt Grajewski- Thank you for taking the time for this interview. I can’t imagine the challenges you have been faced with but I am extremely impressed with how you have responded to meet these challenges as you continue to produce some of the best flies out there right now. There aren’t many tyers I can name that have a better mind when it comes to applying a color palette to a pattern than you. You have come up with some incredibly unique one off flies. Before I wrap up this post, here are a few more flies that I couldn’t help but post. Pure inspiration- enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alright- well I hoped you enjoyed this bonus interview from 2016. You can follow more of Matt’s work through the following links, and please- get in touch with him for some incredible one off orders. Trout, Musky- whatever- he’ll tie you up a trophy box.

Instagram: @flyobsession_matt

Facebook: Fly Obsession

Website: Fly Obsession: http://flyobsession.com/

Documentary: The Brothers Brown: Buy it HERE , trailer below.

 

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Fly Tyer of the Month: Jonathan Kiley

 

warning

The following interview features high levels of synthetic materials on extremely original, progressive fly designs. Viewer Discretion Advised.

All jokes aside, there is still this archaic group of fly tyers out there that feels that synthetic materials somehow dilutes the purity of fly tying. Johnathan Kiley is one of the most progressively minded, creative, out of the box fly tyers in the business today. His designs are outright gaudy at times, but they catch fish. I’ve never seen one of his flies posted and thought that it was or could have been tied by anyone other than himself. Johnathan Kiley created his material business, Fly Skinz, a few years ago, and he is already shaking up the global material market with his innovative products. Without further ado, here is our interview.

First, for the people that are unfamiliar with you or your company Fly Skinz, give them some background. Who you are, and what your company is about.

fly skinz products

 Fly Skinz was created because as I was making up new materials most of the flies were names with “Skinz” in them. It was a brainstorming effort between myself and a mentor within the fly fishing community. What I really needed was a website or source where people could go and see how to use a lot of the products…the www.flyskinz.com was born. The best part about this whole experience so far is the people I have met along the way and the professional relationships I’ve created with them. I consider a lot of them good friends. Yes it is business but I really feel “old school” so to speak with having a relationship with people I do business with on a daily basis. I share a lot of information with them which can be very risky but I feel they will be honest with me in return.

 

     Fly Skinz to me is something of an evolution…I started the business or the thought of a business several years ago. I was tying for guides and friends a lot. I was pretty apt to customizing flies in which ways people could not purchase them. I was always inventing new ways to work with existing materials and even making new ones to help people catch fish. At some point along the way I felt I could use my talents of coming up with new materials and maybe make a living on it.

spiked slow rolla tails

     There is no doubt that the fly tying or fly fishing community is a very saturated industry. It’s actually extremely difficult to make people break the traditions of it. I’m not really worried about the “in-the-box” folks…I want to create something new and revolutionize things. There are a few people pushing those boundaries right there with me and I really feel it is a good thing. Think of traditional archery, or anything else that has evolved over the years…why not fly fishing?

scud skinz

The first product created was actually my Scud Skinz…I was tying a scud pattern to fish the waters of CO below the many reservoirs. These fish here are extremely pressured so I thought I needed to make a more realistic pattern to combat the fish identifying the norm. Literally you will hear people say the fish know fly patterns by name here. Long story short I made my own shell out of vinyl which not only made it appear realistic but was a lot faster to tie than using a plastic bag.

 

It seems like you’ve come pretty far in a relatively short period of time. Getting your materials into Hareline is obviously huge. How has the overall industry reception been? Any haters? We all know the purists that exist within this niche industries.

 

I would agree with you…I am really excited what I have done in a short period of time. With that comes a lot of pressure. I might be the one putting the pressure on myself, but either way I feel it. How do you stand out from so much tradition? How do you create something new in a saturated market? My answer is….thinking, strategy, research and development, and just plain old hard work.

 

With being new there are always going to be “haters” out there. I say, let haters hate. I’ve already been exposed to folks talking crap about what I am doing. It’s no surprise and honestly it’s more disappointing hearing it from someone that is very well known. The thing is, I’m not in this industry to make people mad, or step on toes…I just want to do something where I am free to think on my own. With that, the end goal is to one day work with a team or have a team of people that want to do the same with me. I want to be happy as I’m working hard day in and day out. If I wasted time thinking about that kind of negativity I wouldn’t be where I am today. Fortunately I have people that believe in me and what I am about that have helped me get this far in the industry.

hareline dubbin 2

 

I owe a lot of credit to the Hareline Dubbin team and their support. They took a risk by having a guy such as myself and essentially making me part of this huge thing. I hate disappointing anyone or feeling that I have done so. So I work hard to ensure I am open about how I am running Fly Skinz. I’ve tried at the beginning to partner with  people and no one seems to be “all in”. It was like I was having to be like them in order to make it happen. It also moved slow and if anyone knows me I jump all in no matter what I am doing. If I feel for a split second someone isn’t with me I start solving problems in order to make something worthwhile.

 

You know that I’m drinking your Kool Aid- I immediately saw the innovation when I saw the Fish Finz for the first time. Tell us about the development of the Fish Finz- what gave you the idea, and how did the initial design and manufacturing process go?

 

fish finz

I appreciate that you have enjoyed the Fish Finz! The Fish Finz was  actually something sitting in the corner of my tying bench in a few different forms for a while. It wasn’t until I was in contact with the geniuses at Fly Fish Food that helped it come to fruition. They wanted me to make a sculpin fin so they could skip the annoying parts of making fins the old way. Just to have several finz in the bank ready to rock and roll. I sent them a few samples and it blew up from there.

 

Along the way I ended up developing a whole new material and manufacturing them myself as you see them today. It wasn’t easy, and I basically taught myself a whole new trade. That’s how I work though…all in as I said before. With some discussion with my mentor and what would be more appealing to the market it all came together. I am very fortunate and can’t thank all the people involved in the process enough. Yes I can come up with new ideas and make it work on a fly that fishes unbelievably but if the team effort doesn’t happen between inventor, manufacturer, distributor, shops and the customer…it won’t work.

fly fish food bros
Cheech of Fly Fish Food- one of the earliest tyers using Fly Skinz products. (amazing work)

 

When did you start tying flies or fly fishing? What/who was the inspiration, where did you grow up fishing?
 Well, I was a young lad…just kidding. I was really young (8 yrs old) when I started tying and it was my father who showed me the road to learning. At the time the painstaking process of learning the very basics of everything seemed very unnecessary I now realize why. My father was very methodical and meticulous about teaching me fundamentals. From the beginning to end…so fly fishing for instance. I wasn’t allowed to actually fish until I learned to make all my own equipment. So the flies, rod, fly boxes…you name it! As a kid this was how I spent my time at home. My father was a jack of all trades and knew a lot about everything it seemed. What motivated me today is knowing that all his life he possessed all of these skills and could have probably worked in a field he loved but didn’t. I want to be someone my own family or people can look up to and motivated them to do something they love. After all it is the American way right? I know some people might not feel it is that way anymore but I am a believer. You are your own barrier.
walther white jonathan kiley
The Walter White of fly tying…
What are a few of your favorite flies to tie?
 
This is a tough one… I would have to say anything big like a streamer or a top water fly. The reason why is because I’m probably imagining what the strike or take is going to be like as I am making it. We all live for that tug!
awesome fly

As far as fly design goes your materials lend a unique advantage to anyone with a creative mind. Describe your fly design process Does it start with a new material, an idea, a problem to solve etc?

You nailed it…it’s usually to solve a problem. I’m always in that mode. Realistically it’s the critical thinker mindset I’ve been programmed with. I think I can thank my father for this. Knowing a ton of trades really allows a person to “connect the dots”. Over time you can just look at something and know how it is done. Like tying flies…when I did so many by the book I could just look at a picture and make it. If I didn’t have the exact materials I would improvise or make my own. I don’t mind doing it either, in fact it’s my preferred method. This allows me to be a free-thinker and less stressed:) within that there are some good life lessons.

crab bitz
How would you define your style of fly tying?
My style of tying is driven by my brain…ADHD. Sometimes as I tie a fly I might change it mid way through. However once I have made a great pattern I might only make a few minor changes along the way. Especially if I feel it needs refinement after fishing it.
bass flures 1
ADHD on these foam flies. Amazing.


Will you be tying at any shows this year?

 
I really hope so. Since I work in the aerospace industry full-time I am scheduled to make another move for work. The benefit though is it is somewhere warm and my fishing throughout the year is going to increase dramatically.
tying demo
I heard you grew up back east, where did you grow up and what made you move west? 

I grew up in PA, and fished a lot growing up all over the state. I moved west due to work, but with my job I have fished in places people would have to pay a lot of money to go where I have been. My job is a blessing in disguise for fly fishing. In general I have loved every place I’ve been as far as fishing. This might be because I use it as a stress relief.

What is on the horizon for you and Fly Skinz in 2016. Are you currently developing any new materials?

I have a lot of new ideas I am trying to make come to fruition for next season. I feel ahead of the game but along the way the new ideas keep flowing. These are some new materials coming out that I am really excited about and really think the tying community will be as well. I think this is the basis on how companies either thrive or die. If I could work in an R&D department for a fly company it would be a job come true. The “Brain Train” is what I call it, and never stops.

I saw that you got involved with Project Healing Waters. How did you get involved with them, and how has your experience been?

 I’ve worked with PHWFF for the last 3+ years in many capacities. First I volunteered as a mentor and tied during the tying classes. As I sat in and helped out I wanted to do more. It just so happens one of the leads was stepping out of the tying/training chair position.  I immediately volunteered because I had a lot of ideas. So I developed a class that taught more skill sets than flies. I knew that most of the veterans moved a lot after the program so I wanted the to feel confident in more areas than trout fishing in CO. It only seemed fair. Not to mention the had some amazing trips in saltwater and more. So with the help of my good friend Bill Kirk, we developed curriculum for 4 levels of classes. Each one progressively showed the skills where they could eventually tie anything and everything.

 

Here is a short list of my favorite flies/materials of yours for each one list how difficult they are to tie for an average fly tyer- from a scale of 1 to 10. One being easy, ten being very difficult. And then any tips you can give them.
 

1. Articulated Sculpinz using the Fish Finz:

sculpinz

I really feel this fly can be a 3-6 depending on how crazy you want to get with it. It can be easy like a wooly bugger, some zonker material and finz if you want. Tips for finz…easy as can be. If you want them to stick out simply tie some dubbing dos first and let the material get squeezed in between to help it pop. From there the fish will love the action.

2. Spiked Slow Rolla Tail- favorite type of fly to use them on:

swamp thing

The Swamp Thing… It’s a fly I created to attract the most unsuspecting fish. The slow rolla tails themselves are so universal…you can make worms, bait fish, bugs, your imagination is the only limit.

Back to the fly though…it’s an easy 2. However it catches fish like no other. The action it makes in the water is nothing like any tail out there. You can drag it on the bottom slow as can be and the fish will chomp away. I love that fly!
3. Your Foam “Flures”:

bass flures 2

So these are a recent obsession and take me back to when I was building lures. I also used to make handmade wood lures. These join the two together in ways that make any traditionalist cringe. That’s maybe why I love it 🙂

5. Mini Craw:

mini craw

The mini craw is surprisingly a little complicated…however it is a very effective fly. I will do a video soon I hope…it’s probably a 6-7.

What is your favorite type of:
Vise:  …now it is a Peak Vise
Bobbins: Rite Bobbins
Thread: veevus, mono, and Kevlar
Glue/UV: gorilla superglue & Loon
Fly Box: I love Cliff Boxes but also like tacky boxes for my small stuff
Fly Rod…I’m not a snob when it comes to rods or reels. A lot of manufactures use the same blanks but put their name on it. I have to experience before I buy. With that I have several I love. I’m looking into some glass ones again though.
Fly Reel… Same with reels as rods:)
Vest/Pack:I love Simms gear, and what they stand for. All around great gear.
Other Tool/gadget: hmmm , what can’t leave home without? A good camera…I’ve been sponsored by GoPro since I did triathlons a while back so definitely that.  I’ve also just purchased an Olympus TG-4 camera that I’m starting to really enjoy. 

Are you a member of any pro staff teams? If so- what teams. What are your thoughts about the social media pro staff craze in fly fishing?

I think I could consider myself a member of Harline Dubbin 🙂 and a few others but nothing like “pro staffers” you hear of these days. I’m planning a huge project over the next few years that maybe gets several entities involved.

Any one you want to give a shout out too?

Hareline is at the top of this list, along with Loon as they have also helped me out…of course my local Fly shop “The Peak Fly Shop”.

 

Any parting thoughts?

 

Not much on this except it’d be nice if everyone could just be happy for one another. Do your thing and if something doesn’t go along with your set of rules, as long as it’s not breaking rules…worry about yourself. Not everyone needs to hear your opinions. Appreciate and move on. As for the tying industry itself…there is not much out there that is really new any more unless you invent it yourself. There are those who preach to give credit where credit is due when it comes to patterns. Truth is there are so many patterns out there you could easily associate it back to someone else. I probably don’t know half the amount of tyers out there. Not because I don’t want to but it’s the way it is. Take a stroll at a show in different regions…there is no way to avoid the overlap. So get over yourselves and press on. Some of these “well-known” tyers do the same thing. Trying to preach for credit when they have modified one simple step on an existing pattern. It’s silly really, and I don’t have time for that kind of stuff.
Many thanks to Jonathan Kiley for taking time out of his busy schedule for this interview. He is a great guy, and an extremely talented fly designer. I’ve been using his products in my own flies, and to help spread the message I am going to give away quite a few of his products over the next week or so via Facebook and Instagram. Scroll to the bottom for links and information.
To end the interview, here are a few more pictures of sick fish and sick flies.

belize bonefish
bass flures 3
bass flures amazing collection
bass worm
proof of concept
buggers
mouse bitz
slow rolla fly
clousers with slow rolla
salamanders

fly skinz decals

 

Fly Skinz: www.flyskinz.com
Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKw2CFk90AgqKrngc2mPZiQ
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/flyskinz/
Materials available through Hareline Dubbin
To enter to win some Fly Skinz materials, check out the In Pursuit of Trout Facebook and Instagram pages
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/In-Pursuit-of-Trout-775737565780891/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/inpursuitoftrout/
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